Do we really want to know the truth about our partners? The whole truth?

We don’t even know the truth about ourselves–it’s too complex, we change everyday. Would I love my hubby more, would our marriage be stronger, if we knew every detail of each other? Do I really want to put the relationship under a microscope? Will my commitment be stronger because of a 3 a.m. dissection? ‘

16 replies
Raksha Bharadia
June 7, 2017

16 Comments

  1. We cant bear the thought of dissecting our own little cute hampster, we simply want to picturise it as a cute, loving, trustworthy living being who we share life with. It might just be less complicated to unfold secrets of your partner's past while you are in the process of choosing them.We are often more open and tolerant of traits andqualities about them in that stage of life.Opening up to each other while we can still talk like friends with no strings attached yet. However, once we r bonded for life, the gradual everyday changes should be left to notice rather than discussed.Everything is not an experiment with an aim method and conclusion.Relationships, behavioural changes and truths should sometimes be just left to experience and not dig at!!*p*

  2. I don't think that we need to know every detail of each other to have a strong bonding. It's love and respect that work finally. I want my man as a free bird . If he comes back to me after each flying , he is mine and I will love him till death. *p*

  3. No, never. First and foremost, it is impossible to know the whole truth about anybody, including yourself. There are three truths – one that you know, one that others know about you (which you may not be aware of) and the one that both of you know. A relationship is essentially about two strangers coming together to lead a life together, after knowing whatever they can about one another. But can you know every single thing about your partner’s past? Why and how she or he may have reacted in a particular way, during a particular time? It’s fine to know everything about a partner provided your relationship is so strong that you can confidently say you won’t judge him or her for his or her past actions. Can you? *p*

  4. Nope. Over analysis is never a good idea. Partners should be under no obligation to ‘come clean’. Why should they? As you’ve rightly said, people change all the time. Letting the past out, which is sometimes unpleasant, is bound to ruffle the feathers of the present. Best to let the sleeping dogs lie, and love the people we love for who they are now.

  5. We played an interesting game about 20 years ago. We were a close bunch of freinds, couples mainly and a similar question was asked. It went something like this…”If your spouse had a one night stabnd when he or she was travelling, would you want to know about it? How important is truth and hinesty to you in a relationship.” We were all newly married and all (but one) agreed that honesty is the most imprtant in a relationship and they would want to know everything. *p*The same question was asked about 15 years later when we came across the same book of questions. And EACH AND EVERYONE, most had been married for about 20 years by then, said that tehy would rather not know about something that was best hidden under the rug. They did not want to rock their marriages or feel inadequate if they could not do anything about it – they would rather not know the truth.*p*I guess age in a marriage teaches you to ignore some truths*p*

  6. I think very often we are not completely truthful about ourselves to anyone including our own self. In all areas, what is required is to make ourself stronger and see the intention behind your partner’s actions, whether he/she is completely truthful or not.

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